Hoyer says Dems should gerrymander to prevent ‘unfair competition,’ since Republicans do it too

HomePolitics

Hoyer says Dems should gerrymander to prevent ‘unfair competition,’ since Republicans do it too

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles! House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said Wednesday he agrees with recent comments from the head of Hous

Kate beams as she competes with GB sailing crew in ‘friendly’ competition – VIDEO | Royal | News
Ukrainian band wins Eurovision song competition as war with Russia continues
Golf war tees off because PGA won’t tolerate competition and LIV and let LIV


NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said Wednesday he agrees with recent comments from the head of House Democrats’ re-election arm that blue states should participate in gerrymandering as long as it remains legal and Republicans are doing it too. 

“We’d do absolutely nonpartisan redistricting in every state in the country,” Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Chair Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, D-N.Y., said on MSNBC this week. “We shouldn’t do it just where Democrats are strong, though. We should do it where Republicans are strong.”

Maloney added: “If you’re asking us to unilaterally disarm… I’m a guy that wants to bring a gun to a gunfight, yeah, you bet.” 

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., arrives to speak during the House Democrats' news conference on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call) 

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., arrives to speak during the House Democrats’ news conference on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call) 

MARYLAND’S GERRYMANDERED HOUSE MAP DEFENDED BY DCCC AS GROUP ADDS STATE’S LONE GOP HOUSE MEMBER TO TARGET LIST

When asked about those comments, Hoyer, D-Md., touted Democrats election bill H.R. 1, “which said we ought to have fair redistricting.” But, he told reporters, “if that’s not gonna happen… I think Sean Patrick Maloney is correct that states are not just going to be put in a position that there’s unfair competition.” 

Hoyer, who was recently diagnosed with COVID-19, participated in the call with reporters remotely from his home.

The comment came as the new congressional map in New York is under fire for its narrow, snake-like districts and heavy partisan lean in favor of Democrats. This follows criticism aimed at Democrats in Maryland and Illinois for their own partisan gerrymanders, and GOP gerrymanders in states like Texas – which is being sued by the Department of Justice (DOJ). 

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, D-N.Y., speaks at a hearing in 2019. Maloney is the chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, D-N.Y., speaks at a hearing in 2019. Maloney is the chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.
(Jacquelyn Martin/Pool via REUTERS)

Gerrymandering – named for former Massachusetts Gov. Elbridge Gerry – is when state legislatures draw congressional districts aimed at helping certain parties or politicians win elections. It is most relevant after the Census every 10 years, when states go through a redistricting process to reflect their changed populations.  

DCCC ISSUES SUPPORT FOR AGGRESSIVE NEW YORK GERRYMANDER THAT COULD ELIMINATE 5 GOP SEATS

Gerry was the governor of Massachusetts after the 1810 Census when he signed a bill drawing what are considered the gerrymandered congressional districts. 

In recent years, lawsuits over gerrymandered districts have even made their way up to the Supreme Court, as some voters and politicians argue they are being unfairly discriminated against. 

A police officer patrols in front of of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021.

A police officer patrols in front of of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021.
(Emily Elconin/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

But the Supreme Court ruled in 2019 that partisan gerrymandering cannot be ruled on by federal courts because it’s a political question outside their purview. 

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

That largely leaves questions of gerrymandering up to state politicians and courts – although the DOJ is currently suing Texas under the theory that its redistricting plan violates the Voting Rights Act because it limits representation for racial minorities. 

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0